Cool Heat Wave Video

Heat waves are not cool.  But the video below sure is.



Original source here.

Hat tip: David Lobell.

Comments

  1. high mins outumber new highs 3 to 1:

    http://mapcenter.hamweather.com/records/7day/us.html?c=maxtemp,highmin

    ReplyDelete
  2. I found this by Stu Ostro, "The ridge, heat, humidity, drought, and Dust Bowl"

    http://www.weather.com/blog/weather/8_25097.html

    to be a good description of what is happening in U.S. weather right now.

    As the writer states, comparing our current heat wave to heat in the 1930s, and given the context of climate change:

    "What happened in the 1930s and other decades reinforces that there have always been extremes in weather, and there is always natural variability at play. What's changing now is the nature of those extremes, and also what's important is the context."

    "This time, the extreme drought, heat, and wildfires are occurring along with U.S. extremes this year in rainfall, snowfall, flooding, and tornadoes, and many other stunning temperature and precipitation extremes elsewhere in the world in recent years as well as, as I posted on my TWC Facebook "fan" page, record-shattering 500 millibar heights in high latitudes. And all of this is happening while there's an alarming drop in the amount of Arctic sea ice."

    The nature and context of the extremes is the difference between the 1930s and now.

    ReplyDelete
  3. The other item I found of interest is that as extreme weather events become more common, we are putting ever higher demands on energy consumption:

    As heat index soars, so does record-setting power demand, Vivian Kuo, CNN

    http://www.cnn.com/2011/US/07/21/heat.wave.power.demand/

    "...demand surged to its highest point ever in history Wednesday, peaking at 103,975 megawatts and surpassing the last record set on July 31, 2006. Previously in May, the agency said it expected peak demand for the summer to reach 93,842 megawatts, a projected 1.3% increase over 2010."

    ReplyDelete

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